Surgical strike 2.0: How UPA made mess of a similar opportunity

This is major blow to Pakistan because the country always believed that India will never risk air intrusion which amounts to declaration of war. They miscalculated during the Kargil war in 1999 too. But it was the Air Force jets from the Indian side of the line of control which brought down heavily armed fortified positions across the border.

Written by Diplomatic Correspondent, Newsroom Post February 26, 2019 13:14

New Delhi: Clearly, India’s Ajit Doval–the man behind the planning and execution of surgical strike 1 — is the one behind the Strike 2.0 aimed at terrorist camps in Pakistan.

This is major blow to Pakistan because the country always believed that India will never risk air intrusion which amounts to declaration of war. They miscalculated during the Kargil war in 1999 too. But it was the Air Force jets from the Indian side of the line of control which brought down heavily armed fortified positions across the border.

The Second Strike has proved that under the Modi regime there would be no dithering but that India would take the risks of war with Pakistan if necessary. It appears that the United States was consulted before the strike.

It is also speculated that informally the help of the United State intelligence agencies may have been taken. It is also significant that the Air Force jets were able to sneak in in spite of Pakistan air surveillance.

One giveaway of possible US role was the statement of US President Donald Trump. He was quoted saying two days ago that India is planning something stronger.

The UPA Government was given a similar proposal by the then chief Fali Major. But the UPA Government dithered. This was in a meeting on 28/11 two days after the Mumbai attack.

The UPA Government was then led by Dr Manmohan Singh. If the attack on terrorist camps– as the then Air Force chief Fali Major had suggested–had taken place then, many believe Pakistan would not have dared launched or supported terrorists training from across the border.

This is the first time the government of the day had shown political will.

The impression is gaining ground that in the past governments lacked the political will to strike and give a response to Pakistan. Ajit Doval himself was involved in one such operation during the Kandahar hijack. He was the one who would have been able to execute an Israeli type rescue of the hijacked passengers at Kandahar airport if the government of that day-the Vajpayee Government—had given a green light.

In the case of Mr. Doval too he kept waiting for a green light which never came. Doval was one of the negotiators and had brought NSG commandoes who were smuggled inside the relief aircraft. The hijackers had been identified. Mr. Doval and others had to just to move in. Doval’s clear message to Delhi was that there would be no casualties in the rescue attempt.

But the government dithered and the Taliban troops surrounded the aircraft. A great opportunity was missed.