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Khaby Lame becomes world’s most popular TikToker

Khaby becoming the most popular personality on TikTok is interesting given previous complaints from TikTok fans about how producers of colour — specifically Black creators — are handled.

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New Delhi: TikTok now has a new champion. Khaby Lame, a 22-year-old Senegalese-born creator, surpassed American TikTok star Charli D’Amelio to become the most-followed person on TikTok yesterday night. Lame currently has 142.7 million more followers than D’Amelio, who has 142.3 million.

Khaby, who is located in Italy, first gained popularity by using TikTok’s duet and stich functions to react wordlessly to intricate and hilarious “life hacks.” He currently mostly posts silent comedic skits, which have received millions of views and likes. His fan base began to grow rapidly last year, and in recent weeks, followers have begun campaigns to propel him to the top.

 

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A post shared by Khaby Lame (@khaby00)


Khaby’s rise and deposition of D’Amelio is important. D’Amelio and her sister, Dixie, are two of TikTok’s core figures, having built a complete media brand on what they admit was first accidental stardom. Their quick climb to stardom via seconds-long dance videos has baffled those who aren’t on TikTok — and motivated millions of followers to try the same. According to Forbes, the sisters earned an estimated $27.5 million last year.

Khaby becoming the most popular personality on TikTok is interesting given previous complaints from TikTok fans about how producers of colour — specifically Black creators — are handled.

 

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A post shared by Khaby Lame (@khaby00)


In response to claims that the TikTok algorithm inhibits the content of Black producers, the firm committed in 2020 to take efforts such as forming a diversity committee and providing money to NGOs “that serve the Black community.” Last year, citing a lack of recognition for choreographing viral dances to big songs, several Black creators went on strike, refusing to produce dances that would otherwise benefit white creators disproportionately.

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