Connect with us

India

Tanot Mata Mandir: Know its significance in the present and importance in 1965, 1971 war

After the developmental project gets completed, it is believed to generate employment opportunities in the border area.

Avatar

Published

on

Advertisement

New Delhi: Tanot Mata Mandir, located in Rajasthan’s Jaisalmer, has been in news for the past few days since the visit of Home Minster Amit Shah. The Union Minister visited the location on Saturday to laid the foundation stone for border tourism development work at Tanot temple complex. The complex is just 120 km away from the India-Pakistan international border.

Tanot Mata Mandir significance

Tanot Mata Mandir is under Border Security Force (BSF) due to security reasons. Personnel of the BSF is deployed to perform priestly duties in Tanot Mandir every day. The temple opens daily at 6:00 am and pilgrims are allowed to come till 8:00 PM throughout the week.

After laying the foundation stone for border tourism development work, the significance of the temple has increased. For the development project, the Indian government has sanctioned Rs 17 crore 67 lakh. Under this budget, it has decided to build a waiting room, amphitheater, interpretation centre, room for children, and other necessary facilities.

After the developmental project gets completed, it is believed to generate employment opportunities in the border area. Locals say the deity of the temple protects them from any enemy attack. It is also said that the deity had appeared in the dream of the soldiers and promised to protect them during the war with Pakistani soldiers.

Tanot Mata Mandir importance in 1965, 1971 war

During the Indo-Pakistani war of 1965, it is reported that Pakistan began the shelling on November 17 on Sadewala, a famous post near Tanot Mata temple. The soldiers who were deployed at the post were in the anticipation of martyr hood. However, all the bombs got diffused on their own. Unexpectedly, the 450 bombs that fell on the temple premises fell into silence and did not explode.

During the war against Pakistan in 1971, Pakistani soliders chose to attack another post near the Tanot Temple, namely Longewala. For the second time, they could win over Indian soldiers as the countless shells it faired did not go off.

It is also reported that after the war, the Pakistani General sought permission to visit the temple area. He did not find anything unusual after enquiring about the priests and went back after paying his respects to the Goddess.

Advertisement